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Letter from the President – 8/18/14

Barb Fullman

Just because you asked…..

The National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators (NCCCO) has standard hand signals that are recognized throughout the industry for a reason; by standardizing the signals a Signal Person can help any type of crane operator to stay safe inside the cab of their machine. This picture illustrates some of the most common signals. Why use hand signals in the electronics age? When electronics don’t work, or the workplace is too noisy, a single understood hand signal can save lives. OSHA and the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ (BLS) Census has information about accidents and fatalities involving heavy equipment, but they don’t show the “near misses.” Thanks to the standardization of these hand signals, lives are saved every day – even if they don’t know it!

Hand signals are useful throughout the construction industry, not just for crane operators. Total Equipment Training wants every operator to be safe in their machines, which is why our Signal Person training program is so inclusive for the construction industry, and exclusive to the type of equipment being used. Our trainers will qualify your Signal Person(s) through classroom and hands on training. This program is geared to be site specific and the evaluation will be based on Signal Person requirements at your site. While our program will touch on all the requirements of OSHA 1926.1401, the emphasis will be on your individual sites’ Signal Person needs.

Call us today at 610-321-2679. I would be happy to help and I hope to hear from you soon.

Stay safe, stay up to date.

Barb Fullman,
President

Letter from the President – 8/4/14

Barb Fullman

Just because you asked…..

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ (BLS) Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries, a large number of fatal occupational injuries were related to cranes, derricks, hoists, and hoisting accessories. In OSHA’s analysis of crane accidents in general industry and construction, they identified an average of 71 fatalities each year. OSHA’s analysis also identified the major causes of crane accidents to include: boom or crane contact with energized power lines (nearly 45% of the cases), under the hook lifting device, overturned cranes, dropped loads, boom collapse, crushing by the counter weight, improper outrigger use, falls, and rigging failures. While there is a lack of adequate worker exposure data to calculate the risk of death for the entire population exposed, the risk of death among crane operators alone is staggering. However, underreporting of crane-related injuries and fatalities, due to misclassification and a host of other factors, masks the true magnitude of the problem.

Some cranes are not maintained properly nor inspected regularly to ensure safe operation. Crane operators often do not have the necessary qualifications to operate each piece of equipment safely, and the operator qualifications required in the existing regulations may not provide adequate guidance to employers. The issues of crane inspection/certification and crane operator qualifications and certification need to be addressed in all industry standards.

Total Equipment Training is resolute in providing safety training that is above and beyond the standard for OSHA, ANSI and ASME for all heavy equipment operators. It is our goal to reduce the number of accidents, especially fatalities, from a lack of proper safety training. With crane operators being at such high risk for injury, it is imperative that they receive first-class training like that provided by Total Equipment Training.

Call us today at 610-321-2679. I would be happy to help and I hope to hear from you soon.

Stay safe, stay up to date.

Barb Fullman,
President

Letter from the President – 7/21/14

Barb Fullman

Just because you asked…..

The International Powered Access Federation (IPAF), the Scaffold & Access Industry Association (SAIA), the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM), and the American Rental Association (ARA) joined forces to produce two best practices documents for the Aerial Work Platform (AWP) equipment industry:

The Statement of Best Practices of General Training and Familiarization for Aerial Work Platform Equipment identifies the roles and responsibilities of each person who is involved with the equipment for general training and familiarization for AWPs, and provides best practices and guidelines for their implementation.

The Statement of Best Practices of Personal Fall Protection Systems for Aerial Work Platform Equipment is a general guide for those who want to understand basic fall protection and the best practices for the use of Personal Fall Protection Equipment (PFPE) systems on AWP equipment. It is also intended to assist operators with an overview of applicable regulations and standards, and incorporating recognized industry “Best Practices.”

In 2013, the AWP industry again joined forces to create the Statement of Best Practices for Workplace Risk Assessment and Aerial Work Platform Equipment Selection. This can assist in identifying workplace hazards, offer guidance for conducting a thorough workplace risk assessment, and implementing control measures, as well as assist in the selection of the most appropriate AWP equipment for the work involved.

Today, Total Equipment Training has the best Aerial Work Platform training program available. We can provide onsite classroom and hands-on training for your equipment and operators that is timely, appropriate, and up to all industry standards. Our goal is to ensure that every AWP operator who comes to us has all the information they will need to stay safe on their equipment.

Call us today at 610-321-2679. I would be happy to help and I hope to hear from you soon.

Stay safe, stay up to date.

Barb Fullman,
President

Letter from the President – 7/7/14

Barb Fullman

Just because you asked…..

A hazardous materials (HAZMAT) accident can occur anywhere. Many hazardous materials do not have a taste, color or an odor. Some of these materials can be detected because they cause physical reactions such as watering eyes or nausea. Some hazardous materials exist below ground surface and can be recognized by an oil or foam-like appearance.

Hazardous materials are chemicals, which if misused or released into the environment can cause a threat to that environment and to the health of anyone in the vicinity. These chemical substances are used in industry, agriculture, medical research, and consumer goods. They come in the form of explosives, flammable and combustible substances, poisons, and radioactive materials.

Total Equipment Training hopes to be called before an accident occurs. All employees that work in an area where hazardous materials are used or stored should have OSHA mandated training to know what to do in case of an accident, but more importantly, how to prevent an accident from occurring. We are committed to the safety of all heavy equipment operators, especially those in HAZMAT situations.

Call us today at 610-321-2679. I would be happy to help and I hope to hear from you soon.

Stay safe, stay up to date.

Barb Fullman,
President

 

Letter from the President – 6/23/14

Barb Fullman

Just because you asked…

Last year Industrial Training International (ITI) hosted a webinar about Rigger accidents and Rigger Safety. ITI stated that 81% of accidents they had observed involved synthetic rigging. The demonstration made clear that synthetic sling accidents, typically lacerations or abrasions, were due to the lack of sling protection utilized during a lift. 34% of those polled confirmed that they “have inadequate materials” or “don’t use any” at all on the job site. In ITI’s accident investigation experience, this has been a leading cause of the synthetic sling failures. ITI’s investigations make it clear that “the type of rigging does not heighten or lower the risk, what really counts is the degree to which users are knowledgeable and competent to complete their lifting activities safely. “

Unfortunately, the numbers have not changed very much since then. Even with OSHA standards at their highest in years, there are still too many Rigger accidents that could have been prevented with more training.

Total Equipment Training is dedicated to keeping heavy equipment operators safe in the workplace. That is why, we offer world-class Rigger I and II training. We want all of those who take our classes at their job site to be knowledgeable and competent to complete any lifting activity.

Call us today at 610-321-2679. I would be happy to help and I hope to hear from you soon.

Stay safe, stay up to date.

Barb Fullman,
President

Letter from the President – 6/9/14

Barb Fullman

Just because you asked…

On May 21, 2014 in Indianapolis, Indiana on Interstate 69, a Boom Truck that was installing an overhead ramp sign toppled sideways into traffic and crushed a passing vehicle. I was unable to find out any more information about the occupants of the crushed vehicle, but it still concerns me as a heavy equipment training professional; safety is always my first concern.

The number of fatal and near fatal accidents involving Boom Trucks seems to be on the increase; in May, 2014 alone, I found reports of six accidents involving Boom Trucks. Perhaps, the problem is that too many operators become complacent about observing all the necessary preliminaries before starting their machines. Or, perhaps they haven’t kept up on the refresher safety training that would keep them up to date. At Total Equipment Training, we are dedicated to keeping all of our trainees safe inside of their Boom Trucks and other heavy equipment. We can tailor a Boom Truck Training program for all of your employees to operate your vehicles in the safest way possible.

Call us today at 610-321-2679. I would be happy to help and I hope to hear from you soon.

Stay safe, stay up to date.

Barb Fullman,
President

Letter from the President – 5/26/14

Barb Fullman

Just because you asked…

The International Powered Access Federation (IPAF) has introduced a technical guidance on major inspections for Aerial Work Platforms (AWP) intended to keep equipment safe beyond the manufacturers’ projected machine life expectancy. This document outlines a plan to validate structural integrity and the functionality of critical components of the AWP. The proposal can determine if a machine is within safe design and use criteria beyond its manufacturers’ design life. Design life is defined as “the duration determined by the manufacturer for which a structural component may be used for its intended purpose with recommended maintenance.” However, the growing demand for used machines, and the retention of machines past their expected usability, has led the IPAF to reiterate that AWP equipment owners need to fulfill their legal obligations to ensure that these machines are maintained in good repair and safe working order by authorizing regular inspections, maintenance programs, and continuing refresher training in accordance with local, state, and federal regulations and standards. According to Chris Wraith, IPAF Technical and Safety executive, “We need to recognize that there are machines in use which have been in service for ten years or more, yet may not have reached their design life with regard to usage, and others have reached their design life prior to ten years because of intense usage or use in a severe operating environment.”

Total Equipment Training can provide the necessary inspections and training through our knowledgeable and qualified technical staff. We can bring our Inspectors and Trainers anywhere in the world to help maintain Aerial Work Platforms (AWP) and provide training to operators. It is our goal for machine operators to be safe in or on all of their equipment.

Call us today at 610-321-2679. I would be happy to help and I hope to hear from you soon.

Stay safe, stay up to date.

Barb Fullman,
President

 

Letter from the President – 5/12/14

Barb Fullman

Just because you asked…

A natural avalanche swept down the hillside of State Route 410 over Chinook Pass, Washington state, on Thursday, April 24th, trapping an employee of the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) inside a bulldozer for several hours. WSDOT crews were completing routine snow clearing when the avalanche occurred An employee, working in the bulldozer, about a mile east of the Mount Ranier summit, immediately radioed to crews that snow had enveloped his bulldozer to the top of the cab and he was trapped. Fortunately, he wasn’t injured and WSDOT avalanche crews were able to quickly free him from the bulldozer.

Due to continued avalanche danger, WSDOT, following safety protocols, took every precaution necessary to keep avalanche crew employees as safe as possible during the rescue mission. The bulldozer operator was well-protected inside his machine. The bulldozer had enough ventilation to get fresh air to the operator so that he was safe to remain where he was until crews could free him.

Total Equipment Training is dedicated to keeping all heavy equipment operators safe inside their machines. Our training includes coverage of all OSHA, ANSI and ASME Regulations and Standards. Our trainers are committed to bringing our exceptional instruction and qualification preparation for Bulldozer operation to companies which employ experienced and novice operators.

Call us today at 610-321-2679. I would be happy to help and I hope to hear from you soon.

Stay safe, stay up to date.

Barb Fullman,
President

Letter from the President – 4/29/14

Barb Fullman

Just because you asked…

We at Total Equipment Training are concerned about the OSHA regulation 1926.1427(b)(2) which states: “An operator will be deemed qualified to operate a particular piece of equipment if the operator is certified under paragraph (b) [Certification by an accredited crane operator testing organization] of this section for that type and capacity of equipment or for higher-capacity equipment of that type. If no accredited testing agency offers certification examinations for a particular type and/or capacity of equipment, an operator will be deemed qualified to operate that equipment if the operator has been certified for the type/capacity that is most similar to that equipment and for which a certification examination is available. The operator’s certificate must state the type/capacity of equipment for which the operator is certified.”

The National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators (NCCCO) accepts the operator training and certification training provided by Total Equipment Training trainers as being appropriate for taking NCCCO certification tests for all types of crane operators. Our trainers have had extensive training themselves in the operation of these cranes, and other personnel associated with crane operation, including Riggers and Signal Persons. We at Total Equipment Training take pride in our trainers, who travel around the world to provide employers with the best possible training for their employees.

We are not willing to pass on to the workplace anyone who has not passed our rigorous training and testing programs. We do this because we care about the people we train. Total Equipment Training is dedicated to employee safety.

Call us today at 610-321-2679. I would be happy to help and I hope to hear from you soon.

Stay safe, stay up to date.

Barb Fullman,
President

 

Letter from the President – 4/15/14

Barb Fullman

Just because you asked…

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed the Tier 4 Interim (Tier 4i) Diesel Emission Standards regulations for 2008-2015. Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) of Front End Loader / Backhoes need to change allowable particulate emissions to comply with Tier 4. Forward thinking OEMs, instead of simply retrofitting existing machine designs, have updated machine design to respond to the upward trend in the construction business. This means more fuel-efficient, streamlined machines that are more versatile, durable and maneuverable. The machine chassis is smaller, and now has greater cab visibility so that the operator is better able to see hazards, blockages, crack in pipes, etc. while trenching.

The OEMs have made hydraulic innovations for the Front End Loader / Backhoe which include usage of variable drive pumps rather than gear pumps. This means that the machine’s engine can perform at lower RPMs, thereby reducing fuel handling. It also means that these variable drive pumps can allow higher pressures, enabling increased rear wheel breakout force, while allowing more precise machine movement. Further, the OEMs have initiated use of more electronic controls to enable the operator to obtain additional operational data in the cab, as well as making it possible for remote, instantaneous, diagnostic maintenance.

Thanks to the addition of available, numerable attachments, the Front End Loader / Backhoe has become the “Swiss Army Knife” of construction equipment. The owner / operators of these machines can now apply them to many different types of construction and development jobs.

Total Equipment Training can provide an innovative training program for these latest smaller machines which will include all OSHA safety regulations to better prepare operators to use the newest types of Front End Loader / Backhoes for peak efficiency in the workplace.

Call us today at 610-321-2679. I would be happy to help and I hope to hear from you soon.

Stay safe, stay up to date.

Barb Fullman,
President

 

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